Historical Hetalia
WW2 Ludwig and Alfred

WW2 Ludwig and Alfred

notifhellfreezesover:

(It’s just a tank, Timo, don’t freak out too much.)

Hetalia belongs to Himaruya Hidekaz

Art and Comic belongs to Tomato-Bird/Chorsahgryphon (aka MEEE)

Finland belongs to himself.


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*Blares trumpets in the distance* THE LONG AWAITED RETURN!!
 A big kiitos paljon to everyone who has read, commented, and encouraged me on this project! I’ve learned so much while making, it, about Finland, about history, about making comics in general! I’m happy I finally get to draw Finland in his winter war uniform, I’ve had enough of his sweater vest, heheh. 

As you can see, I’ve tried to stay true to the style of the previous comics, though now I’m inking with pens instead of brushes so it a) looks neater and b) is less messy! I think I’ve improved a lot since the first comics, hope it’s noticeable in the newer ones! I’m excited because now we’re finally past all this prologuey political context stuff and can move on to the action of the event.

On to the History part!

I have to lol so hard at whoever thought telling the Finns “We’re not bombing you we’re dropping bread on your poor starving people!” was a good idea, because NOBODY was fooled. Finns in the countryside began sarcastically calling the bomber planes “Molotov’s Breadbaskets”, after Soviet Minister of Foreign affairs Vyacheslav Molotov. Also frustrating was that the Soviet Union at the beginning was still trying to excuse the invasion with a false accusation of “you guys attacked us first, so now our non-aggression treaty is null.”

Also pretty much the rest of the world supported Finland verbally, and denounced the actions of the Red Army. Although there were a bunch of volunteers from around Europe who helped fight, and some places helped sell weapons and stuff–more on that later :D–most of the Allies were bogged down still trying to decide what to do now that they had officially declared war against Germany (the “Phony war”), and thus were not eager to make any big moves to help. Anyway, many didn’t think Finland would last very long either.

as for the “good news and bad news” part for the battle of Terijoki. Good News: They did hold up really well and caused the Red Army a lot of trouble and delayed their invasion schedule as well, by basically barricading and booby trapping the entire town with mines, bombs, and a few strategically hidden snipers that made it seem like the Finnish force was bigger than it actually was.  Bad News: The Finnish force encountered tanks for the first time! Heavy armored vehicles, while they would prove to be pretty impractical in the long run, were still pretty formidable weapons that the Red Army had a lot of. Hence Timo’s freaked out face at the last page there. 

Also: if you haven’t read the previous comics, guess what Stalin wanted for his birthday :] 

This is all done on my own research and reading, through various websites, history forums, and the book The Winter War: Russia’s Invasion of Finland 1939-1930 by Robert Edwards. As usual, if anyone has anything to comment on, correct, add context to, please tell me! This whole project is a learning experience for me as well. :D

Moi moi!

-Taylor

chevalierviolet:

The French Resistance (French: La Résistance française) is the name used to denote the collection of French resistance movements that fought against the Nazi German occupation of France and against the collaborationist Vichy régime during World War II. Résistance cells were small groups of armed men and women (called the Maquis in rural areas), who, in addition to their guerrilla warfare activities, were also publishers of underground newspapers, providers of first-hand intelligence information, and maintainers of escape networks that helped Allied soldiers and airmen trapped behind enemy lines. The men and women of the Résistance came from all economic levels and political leanings of French society, including émigrés; conservative Roman Catholics, including priests; and citizens from the ranks of liberals, anarchists, and communists.
The French Resistance played a significant role in facilitating the Allies’ rapid advance through France following the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, and the lesser-known invasion of Provence on 15 August, by providing military intelligence on the German defenses known as the Atlantic Wall and on Wehrmacht deployments and orders of battle. The Résistance also planned, coordinated, and executed acts of sabotage on the electrical power grid, transportation facilities, and telecommunications networks. It was also politically and morally important to France, both during the German occupation and for decades afterward, because it provided the country with an inspiring example of the patriotic fulfillment of a national imperative, countering an existential threat to French nationhood. The actions of the Résistance stood in marked contrast to the collaboration of the regime based at Vichy.
After the landings in Normandy and Provence, the paramilitary components of the Résistance were organized more formally, into a hierarchy of operational units known, collectively, as the French Forces of the Interior (FFI). Estimated to have a strength of 100,000 in June 1944, the FFI grew rapidly, doubling by the following month, and reaching approximately 400,000 by October of that year.Although the amalgamation of the FFI was, in some cases, fraught with political difficulties, it was ultimately successful, and it allowed France to rebuild the fourth-largest army in the European theatre (1.2 million men) by VE Day in May 1945.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Resistance

chevalierviolet:

The French Resistance (French: La Résistance française) is the name used to denote the collection of French resistance movements that fought against the Nazi German occupation of France and against the collaborationist Vichy régime during World War II. Résistance cells were small groups of armed men and women (called the Maquis in rural areas), who, in addition to their guerrilla warfare activities, were also publishers of underground newspapers, providers of first-hand intelligence information, and maintainers of escape networks that helped Allied soldiers and airmen trapped behind enemy lines. The men and women of the Résistance came from all economic levels and political leanings of French society, including émigrés; conservative Roman Catholics, including priests; and citizens from the ranks of liberals, anarchists, and communists.

The French Resistance played a significant role in facilitating the Allies’ rapid advance through France following the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, and the lesser-known invasion of Provence on 15 August, by providing military intelligence on the German defenses known as the Atlantic Wall and on Wehrmacht deployments and orders of battle. The Résistance also planned, coordinated, and executed acts of sabotage on the electrical power grid, transportation facilities, and telecommunications networks. It was also politically and morally important to France, both during the German occupation and for decades afterward, because it provided the country with an inspiring example of the patriotic fulfillment of a national imperative, countering an existential threat to French nationhood. The actions of the Résistance stood in marked contrast to the collaboration of the regime based at Vichy.

After the landings in Normandy and Provence, the paramilitary components of the Résistance were organized more formally, into a hierarchy of operational units known, collectively, as the French Forces of the Interior (FFI). Estimated to have a strength of 100,000 in June 1944, the FFI grew rapidly, doubling by the following month, and reaching approximately 400,000 by October of that year.Although the amalgamation of the FFI was, in some cases, fraught with political difficulties, it was ultimately successful, and it allowed France to rebuild the fourth-largest army in the European theatre (1.2 million men) by VE Day in May 1945.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Resistance

Bonsoir! Le 14 Juillet trois couleurs-contrails ornent le ciel de Paris. Ce fut amusant de dessiner! France porte une uniforme de sans-culottes. Pardon mon pour mauvais française. Je suis débutant en française. Enfin, bon anniversaire la France et  j’espère vous aimez. Commentaire s’il vous plaît I had lots of fun drawing this! I tried drawing France in the sans-culottes outfit. Bastille Day is what it’s called in English speaking countries, it’s formally called Fete nationale, or as I have it in the title, Le quatorze juillet [July 14]. This day is marked because of the storming of the Bastille. In my French class we did lots of history research on this. Also sorry if my French is wrong. I’m only in French 1 but I’m practicing over the summer to prepare for French 2. If there’s something wrong and there’s someone who speaks French, I’d appreciate the corrections. Please comment and fave! Info: During the 1780’s France had a society built of 3 estates. The first two are on top and the third were taxed and lived off scraps. To relieve the tension and end peasant riots, Louis’s financial adviser, John Necker had made him gather all 3 etstes to deal with the crisis together. However the bourgeoise [working class] arrived they were locked out of the meeting place. They stormed into an indoor tennis court and held their own meeting there; forming the national assembly. However, paranoia spread. There were rumors that the king was surrounding Paris with troops, ready to slaughter the national assembly. The citizens took a preemptive strike and storm the Bastille for ammunition. It was a symbol of the monarch’s abuse of power. it was a fortress, a prison where brutal inhuman torture took place. Shortly after the storming of the Bastille, on 4 August, feudalism was abolished and on the 26 The Declaration of The Rights of Man and of the Citizen proclaimed.

Bonsoir! Le 14 Juillet trois couleurs-contrails ornent le ciel de Paris. Ce fut amusant de dessiner! France porte une uniforme de sans-culottes. Pardon mon pour mauvais française. Je suis débutant en française. Enfin, bon anniversaire la France et  j’espère vous aimez. Commentaire s’il vous plaît 

I had lots of fun drawing this! I tried drawing France in the sans-culottes outfit. Bastille Day is what it’s called in English speaking countries, it’s formally called Fete nationale, or as I have it in the title, Le quatorze juillet [July 14]. This day is marked because of the storming of the Bastille. In my French class we did lots of history research on this. Also sorry if my French is wrong. I’m only in French 1 but I’m practicing over the summer to prepare for French 2. If there’s something wrong and there’s someone who speaks French, I’d appreciate the corrections. Please comment and fave! 

Info: During the 1780’s France had a society built of 3 estates. The first two are on top and the third were taxed and lived off scraps. To relieve the tension and end peasant riots, Louis’s financial adviser, John Necker had made him gather all 3 etstes to deal with the crisis together. However the bourgeoise [working class] arrived they were locked out of the meeting place. They stormed into an indoor tennis court and held their own meeting there; forming the national assembly. However, paranoia spread. There were rumors that the king was surrounding Paris with troops, ready to slaughter the national assembly. The citizens took a preemptive strike and storm the Bastille for ammunition. It was a symbol of the monarch’s abuse of power. it was a fortress, a prison where brutal inhuman torture took place. Shortly after the storming of the Bastille, on 4 August, feudalism was abolished and on the 26 The Declaration of The Rights of Man and of the Citizen proclaimed.

sully-s:

So near the end of WWII Canada liberated  the Randstad,  (four largest Dutch cities Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht) from German occupation. Which allowed Canada to send food aid to the many of dutch citzens who where suffering from the Hongerwinter (‘Hungerwinter’). The Netherlands were so thankful   for Canada’s help that they send Canada ten thousand tulips every year since the war which started the  Canadian Tulip Festival.

sully-s:

So near the end of WWII Canada liberated  the Randstad,  (four largest Dutch cities Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht) from German occupation. Which allowed Canada to send food aid to the many of dutch citzens who where suffering from the Hongerwinter (‘Hungerwinter’). The Netherlands were so thankful   for Canada’s help that they send Canada ten thousand tulips every year since the war which started the  Canadian Tulip Festival.

Hello admin! I have a favour to ask you. Quindecim15, an artist who does historically accurate German brothers, is going to publish a doujinshi centered on Henry the Lion and formation of Brandenburg-Prussia. Most of her art can be found at the APH(:) Bavaria or APH(:) Saxony tag. However we need to do promotion in order to attract people to buy the book. Is it too much if you can do me a huge favour of reblogging the promo post some time later this week? Much appreciated! ;n;

sure thing just send or submit a link and I’ll post it up

fuckyeahhetalianhistory:

Title: Cavalry of the Commonwealth Artist: rainy_takakoCharacter(s) or Pairing(s): Lithuania + PolandRating: GSummary: Based off the Polish Hussar uniforms, the army of the Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth rides to battle~
I think I will do like a Poland tribute… but that’s going to be way later. So I’ll be stocking up on Poland stuff till then. ;D

fuckyeahhetalianhistory:

Title: Cavalry of the Commonwealth
Artist: rainy_takako
Character(s) or Pairing(s): Lithuania + Poland
Rating: G
Summary: Based off the Polish Hussar uniforms, the army of the Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth rides to battle~

I think I will do like a Poland tribute… but that’s going to be way later. So I’ll be stocking up on Poland stuff till then. ;D

alittlecranberry:

I am POLAND by Janemin
…because serious historical Hetalia is needed

alittlecranberry:

I am POLAND by Janemin

…because serious historical Hetalia is needed

machomapleart:

“At the end of the day, its forward elements stood deeper into France than those of any other division. The opposition the Canadians faced was stronger than that of any other beach save Omaha. That was an accomplishment in which the whole nation could take considerable pride.” - John Keegan, British historian.
___________________________________________________________________________________
On June 6, 1944, now known to history as D-Day, Operation Overlord, the long-awaited invasion of Northwest Europe, began with Allied landings on the coast of Normandy. The task was formidable for the Germans had turned the coastline into a continuous fortress with guns, pillboxes, wire, mines and beach obstacles - and on it depended the outcome of the war.
The military planners had given Canada a major role on D-Day: to take one of the five designated beaches where Allied forces were to land to begin the liberation of Europe from Nazi Germany. The Americans had Utah and Omaha beaches in the west, then came the British at Gold, then the Canadians at Juno Beach and finally the British at Sword on the east.
The greatest seaborne invasion in history was aimed at 80 kilometres of mostly flat, sandy beach along the Normandy coast, west of the Seine River, east of the jutting Cotentin Peninsula. Canada’s objective was right in the middle.
There were about 155,000 soldiers, 5,000 ships and landing craft, 50,000 vehicles and 11,000 planes set for the coming battle.
Before dawn on D-Day, 230 heavy bombers from RCAF No.6 Group pounded German shore batteries with 860 tons of bombs. And in the daylight hours, RCAF fighter squadrons flew top cover for the invasion beaches. Fifty Canadian destroyers, frigates and corvettes assisted in covering the invasion, providing anti-submarine escort and bombarding shore targets. 14,000 Canadians stormed ashore on Juno Beach and were the only force to capture all their initial objectives that day, at a cost of 1000 casualties, of which 350 were fatal.
In preparation for the invasion, Americans, British and Canadians underwent months of special training. Supplies were amassed in southern England. Ground, sea and air forces rehearsed endlessly to ensure perfect timing and co-operation.
Source

machomapleart:

“At the end of the day, its forward elements stood deeper into France than those of any other division. The opposition the Canadians faced was stronger than that of any other beach save Omaha. That was an accomplishment in which the whole nation could take considerable pride.” - John Keegan, British historian.

___________________________________________________________________________________

On June 6, 1944, now known to history as D-Day, Operation Overlord, the long-awaited invasion of Northwest Europe, began with Allied landings on the coast of Normandy. The task was formidable for the Germans had turned the coastline into a continuous fortress with guns, pillboxes, wire, mines and beach obstacles - and on it depended the outcome of the war.

The military planners had given Canada a major role on D-Day: to take one of the five designated beaches where Allied forces were to land to begin the liberation of Europe from Nazi Germany. The Americans had Utah and Omaha beaches in the west, then came the British at Gold, then the Canadians at Juno Beach and finally the British at Sword on the east.

The greatest seaborne invasion in history was aimed at 80 kilometres of mostly flat, sandy beach along the Normandy coast, west of the Seine River, east of the jutting Cotentin Peninsula. Canada’s objective was right in the middle.

There were about 155,000 soldiers, 5,000 ships and landing craft, 50,000 vehicles and 11,000 planes set for the coming battle.

Before dawn on D-Day, 230 heavy bombers from RCAF No.6 Group pounded German shore batteries with 860 tons of bombs. And in the daylight hours, RCAF fighter squadrons flew top cover for the invasion beaches. Fifty Canadian destroyers, frigates and corvettes assisted in covering the invasion, providing anti-submarine escort and bombarding shore targets. 14,000 Canadians stormed ashore on Juno Beach and were the only force to capture all their initial objectives that day, at a cost of 1000 casualties, of which 350 were fatal.

In preparation for the invasion, Americans, British and Canadians underwent months of special training. Supplies were amassed in southern England. Ground, sea and air forces rehearsed endlessly to ensure perfect timing and co-operation.

Source

chevalierviolet:

" Never was so much owed by so many to so few… "
- Winston Churchill
The Few were the Allied airmen of the Royal Air Force (RAF) who fought the Battle of Britain in the Second World War. The term comes from Winston Churchill’s phrase “Never, in the field of human conflict, was so much owed by so many to so few.” It also alludes to Shakespeare’s famous speech in his play, Henry V: “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers…”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Few
———-
A redraw of sorts of this two-year-old piece. At the time I was wondering how to interpret the battle of Britain because it gave me a lot to work on. This was the second option at the time. 
So after some time, it came back to me and I figured, what the heck.
Let’s do this.

chevalierviolet:

" Never was so much owed by so many to so few… "

- Winston Churchill

The Few were the Allied airmen of the Royal Air Force (RAF) who fought the Battle of Britain in the Second World War. The term comes from Winston Churchill’s phrase “Never, in the field of human conflict, was so much owed by so many to so few.” It also alludes to Shakespeare’s famous speech in his play, Henry V: “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers…”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Few

———-

A redraw of sorts of this two-year-old piece. At the time I was wondering how to interpret the battle of Britain because it gave me a lot to work on. This was the second option at the time. 

So after some time, it came back to me and I figured, what the heck.

Let’s do this.